Best Landscape Photo Camera Settings (with Example Photos)

There is nothing like a beautifully composed sharp landscape photo. I have been a windows user for many years (I guess I am one of those loyal users who has just not been able to switch to a Mac).

One of the things I have always liked about Windows is their excellent wallpaper images. There is one particular image that I really love and it is that beautiful landscape image of a rolling green hill with bright hues of blue and patchy white clouds making up the sky.

Popularly known as ‘Bliss’, this image, by American photographer Charles O’Rear, is probably the most seen landscape photo in history; widely because Windows XP has been by far used by the largest number of users across the globe.

Today I shall be trolling about my love for landscape photos and their camera settings.

1. New Zealand Landscape

NZ Landscape from the van by Benurs
NZ Landscape from the van by Benurs

Settings: Shot on a Nikon D90. F/5, 1/125th of a second, 58mm, ISO 200

New Zealand’s breathtaking beauty is no longer a secret. We have already seen much of it in movies like LOTR and The Chronicles of Narnia.

So this image may not be that much of a surprise to some. But what I like about this picture is that it was shot in jpeg and had almost no post-production done to it, except, as the photographer states, just a bit of darkening of the sky.

Related Posts: Easy Landscape Photography Tips 

2. Desert Landscape

I am definitely not a D90 fan and neither do I get paid for promoting it, but somehow the next image is also shot by a D90.

Desert landscape V
Desert landscape V by picturesofyou-

Camera SettingsShot on Nikon D90. F/8, 1/250th of a second, 28mm, ISO 400.

One of the requirements of a good landscape image is that it should be sharp corner to corner and everything should be in focus. In order to achieve that you need to use a bigger f-number and with that master the art of calculating the hyperfocal distance for your lens on the fly.

Though I am not sure whether the photographer was focusing on the hyperfocal distance, a bigger f-number was definitely used.

3. Mountain Range

Mountain winter snowy landscape
Mountain winter snowy landscape by Pawel Pacholec

Landscape Photography SettingsShot on Canon EOS 50D. F/6.3, 1/400th of a second, 70mm, ISO 200.

For somebody who is in love with mountains, this image is a stunning reminder of the breathtaking beauty and awe-inspiring magnificence these mighty features stand for.

I have a personal belief. When you feel pampered, spoilt and to some extent arrogant, stand in front of greatness. In this case, I am referring to nature’s many examples of greatness. You immediately get a reality check and your restless mind is pacified. This particular image captures the magnificence of the mountains beautifully.

4. HDR Technique

White Muscles
White Muscles by Neil Kremer

Camera SettingsShot on Nikon D50. F/8, 1/30th of a second, 10mm, ISO 200.

Landscape photography is one of the key areas where the HDR technique is used. The above beautiful image was shot and then post-process using the HDR technique. In fact, three images were combined to produce this single image. As a result, a single exposure detail wouldn’t do justice to our inquisitive minds.

Nevertheless, I have attached one set of values to give you a ballpark idea.

Related Post: HDR Photography Explained

5. Sunset over water

midnight sun by josef.stuefer
midnight sun by josef.stuefer

Camera Setting: Shot on a Sony Cybershot Point & Shoot. F/4, 1/500th of a second, 9.7 mm, ISO 100.

Sunset over water is such a serene sight. It has a calming effect on the soul. The above image is everything that you would expect out of a sunset, warm golden hues, a textured sky, water, and a silhouetted horizon line.

The reflection of the setting sun on the wet beach feels as if someone has spilled liquid gold on it. In every sense, it is a stunning landscape photograph.